The Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa (CAPA)

THE COUNCIL OF ANGLICAN PROVINCES OF AFRICA (CAPA)

The Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa (CAPA) was established in 1979 in Chilema, Malawi, to coordinate and articulate issues affecting the Church and communities across the region. The CAPA operates in 12 Anglican Provinces: Burundi, Central Africa (Botswana, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe), Congo, Indian Ocean (Madagascar, Seychelles and Mauritius), Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Southern Africa (Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa Swaziland), Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, West Africa (Ghana, Cameroon, Togo, Sierra Leone and Liberia) and the Diocese of Egypt, covering a total of 25 African countries where the Anglican Church has a presence.

The CAPA is a strategic organisation and is mandated by all of the African Primates to provide a platform to coordinate the continental and global activities for the Anglican Church in Africa. Its Secretariat is headed by a General Secretary who is based in Nairobi. The CAPA reaches out to individuals, communities and groups through over 40 million dedicated church members in different communities in Africa. The council’s strategic programme priorities include capacity building for strategic leadership, theological education, advocacy in such areas as human trafficking and migration, child protection, gender-based violence and interfaith and intercultural dialogue. It also provides church leadership (lay and ordained) with training opportunities, direction, information and support.

USPG partners with the CAPA in projects aimed at eradicating human trafficking and modern slavery. We also currently support the CAPA’s capacity building programme with an annual grant. This is a three-year programme running from 2018 to 2021, with the goal of strengthening capacity and effective leadership development. USPG’s partnership with the CAPA on this programme focuses on areas which, in the experience of both organisations, are crucial to the Anglican Church in Africa fulfilling its mission, given the rapid changes taking place both on the African continent and in the life of the Church itself.